Archive | November 2013

Melancholy

Today I’m feeling a little bit melancholy.

My son is growing up.

I know this not a great, big surprise because that’s what children do. But with his dyspraxia some milestones took longer than for other kids. Walking, talking, socializing, self feeding, all sort of things took longer. In other words, I got to hold him closer to me for longer.

Now, it’s starting to be time to let him pull a way just a little bit.

Three (possibly 4, but I think 3) years ago today was the first time I left him alone with my father. Dad is currently 87 (and more spry than me!). At the time, princeling didn’t talk very much, and what he did say was often unintelligible. I left them together so I could go buy my Nook on special for $ 79 (which was for the plain old one… scored the HD version today for same price!). I really wanted one, and access to the free books. And to not have to drive so freaking long to get a new book. So my dad (whom we live with), sat back in the bedroom and watched my son play video games for the hour and a half it took me to get down there, do what I needed to and come back. There was no way in %^&* that I would have taken princeling out that day— couldn’t talk, too friendly, apt to walk off with total strangers without a peep.

Not so very long ago, I also had to build all of his Lego’s. We had many sets, but at the time, he loved the Hero Factory line. Think snap together dolls for boys. He loved them. So I built them. Boy, did I build them.

Today, we *both* went to Barnes and Nobles to pick up the new nook (Merry Christmas Mommy!). I had told him he could go look at the Lego’s while I talked with the nook lady, and I’d get him some. He did. He stayed right where I put him, again, and proved that he could be left alone for short bursts of time. He even told two ladies shopping for their grandsons that they were buying their Lego Guys wrong– and they thought he was adorable and helpful.

They actually appreciated his help.

When we got home, he started building his Hero Factory guys. All by himself.

And I miss it.

I miss him.

But that’s ok. It’s my job to give him wings, not to clip them no matter what his diagnosis. So I let him tell ladies all about Lego’s and answer their questions. And I let him build his guys all by himself.

And take lots of pictures.

 

If you’d like to know more about Dyspraxia, a neurological condition that affects 1 in 10,  check out the website Dyspraxia USA or check them out on Facebook

 

 

For my faithful readers, I’ll have a review up tomorrow and possibly even a writing related post on Sunday. Four day weekends are the best!

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Chop Chop: Book Review of Antiques Chop: A Trash N Treasure Mystery

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I got this surprise in my little envelope from Kensington Books this month. I wasn’t sure why, but settled in to read it anyways.

Oh, My. Gawd!

It’s a great cozy mystery, don’t get me wrong. But what made me say “Awesome Sauce!” was the comments directed at the reader. Because in the world of Brandy and Vivian, they not only solve mysteries, they also write them. And when they comment directly to us, dear readers, it’s hilarious. Their comments about watching language so they can finally (finally!) crack the Walmart market, the notes between daughter (Brandy) and mother (Vivian) and of course, their beleaguered editor…. oh my goodness. And the last chapter— written by hand because they don’t allow laptops in jail.

HA!

I loved this book. I loved all the little nods to them telling a story, the “dear reader” moments. I kept reading fast and faster, trying to catch more of them. This is the latest in a series— I’m going to have to go back and read the other ones too. Whee!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Have you read this series? How many Dear Reader moments are there? Maybe I’ll have to go back and count… on account they are dipped in  awesome sauce.

 

 

Book Review: Just Like Other Daughters

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This weeks book, Just Like Other Daughters by Colleen Faulkner, works on so many levels. There’s sorrow and humor and hope threaded through out the novel, just as in real life. At its heart, the book is about a mother’s love for her child. That child happens to have Down’s Syndrome.

The ending of the novel is foreshadowed in the very first line: I lost Chloe twice. Throughout the novel, there are little blips where it switches from first person past to first person present… Those blips are not a slip (and you know me, I’d call ’em out if they were). You need to pay attention to them. As a writer, I find it breath taking how she prepares us, the reader, for what’s going to happen and yet… it still makes you catch your breath on a small sob when it does.

Now, on a more personal note… This book made me look at how tightly I keep my son to me. Granted, he’s only seven years old. However… I started loosening the reigns with him. Because he *can* do it. We went into B&N (you know I love that store), it was just the two of us. He wanted to play at the Lego table. He PROMISED he wouldn’t go anywhere else– not even to the bathroom. And if anyone tried to take him somewhere else, he’d scream.

So I walked away. Like any good mom, I hid behind a book shelf and watched him for a while. He was perfectly fine. I walked away for a few minutes, went back to check and there he was… still happily building at the Lego table. Shopped some more, went back and checked on him. The guy working the Nook desk finally took pity on me and told me “He’s fine. I’m right here, and he’s fine.”

Wow. Am I that much of a helicopter mom? I need to loosen the reigns, I guess, and let him learn to live in the real world instead of the bubble I want to make for him.

At the heart of “Just Like Other Daughters”, that’s what Alicia and Chloe face. Chloe has Down syndrome… and comes home in love one day. How do you let go, how do you protect your child while letting them experience the world… That is what Just Like Other Daughters is about.